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CNO Final Conference was successful

After three years, the CNO projects initial funding is finished and the project presented key findings and recommendation. In addition, many experts gave great speeches on the topic. See the PowerPoint presentation and reads a short summary.

Salmon company Mowi’s strategy to reduce marine litter

We know that fisheries is a major source to marine littering, but what about aquaculture? Plastic and micro plastic from aquaculture is possibly less mapped than litter from fisheries, but is still a source to marine littering.

Identifying the challenges and promoting the recommendations

To create awareness about lost fishing gear and bits and pieces from fishing gear is the main subject on the final conference by the Clean Nordic Oceans (CNO) in Gothenburg 21. and 22. November.

Greenland launches various initiatives to remove and recycle derelict fishing gear

Lost and derelict fishing gear has a increasing focus around the world and Greenland is no exception. In 2019, several projects dealing with derelict fishing gear and the cleanup of fishing grounds has secured finance.

Work toward awareness, mapping, retrieval and recycling of litter from fisheries.

There are many good projects and companies working on awareness, mapping, retrieval and recycling of litter from fisheries. Here, you can get a brief overview and find links to more information.

The northernmost retrieval survey has ended

Never before has the Norwegian retrieval survey been so far north to retrieve lost fishing gear. This, in order to prevent ghost fishing and reduce marine litter. The total “catch” is one of the largest since the start of the annual retrieval surveys.

Furuno Norge AS launches Lost Gear Finder

Today (04.09.2019), Furuno Norge AS launched their “Lost Gear Finder”. The Managing Director says “The technology has been tested with satisfactory results”.

Mapping ghost nets in Danish waters

How much derelict fishing gear is there in the sea around Denmark, and how can it be removed? DTU Aqua at Technical University of Denmark will now investigate this

The impact of lost pots in crustacean fishery - A study from 2016

A study published in 2016 claims that by removing 9 % of the lost traps and pots in a area, the annual crustacean harvest will increase by 27%.

Recycling of fishing gear in Iceland

In Iceland, recycling of fishing gear is both enabled by laws as well as carried and facilitated by voluntary action of the fishing industry.While the government has the power to collect a fee on all fishing gear sold in Iceland to support recycling, this fee is currently waived in favor of an industry led recycling effort. The fishing industry collects and sorts its disused gear and sends up to 90% of it to appropriate recycling facilities.